Johnson Bill Provides AVI Tax Relief

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COUNCILMAN KENYATTA Johnson, seen here with a constituent at 23rd & Bainbridge Streets, will introduce bill in City Council to provide relief for homeowners with property-tax increase.

COUNCILMAN Kenyatta Johnson will introduce a bill in City Council today that will provide property-tax relief for residents hit hardest by the new property-tax hike.
Johnson feels the City’s AVI assessment might force some low-income homeowners out of their homes.
The hardship referral Bill, will provide relief to low-income families who are experiencing an extraordinary increase in real estate taxes, Johnson said.
Taxpayers under the Bill would be able to defer any amount over two-and-a-half times their current bill. For example, if a taxpayer pays $2,000 in 2012, but their reassessment in 2013 is $8,000, then they must pay $5,000, but can defer $3,000. Taxpayers can defer the money until next year or when the house is sold.
” I don’t want constituents to be priced out of their home, whether they live in Point Breeze or Graduate Hospital,” Johnson said. “That’s why it’s important we introduce relief efforts for those who fear the new assessment might force them out of the city.”
Thousands of south Philadelphia homeowners have received a increase in their property tax assessment in the mail from the city. Some have seen a 1000 percent increase.
First District Councilman Mark Squilla and Johnson have said their office has been flooded with constituents concerned they cannot afford the tax hike.
“Most of my constituents have expressed they don’t mind paying their pay share,” Johnson said. “However, clearly the initiative has winners and losers.
“I’m concerned with the negative input that AVI will have on many of my constituents.”

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2 Responses to Johnson Bill Provides AVI Tax Relief

  1. Residential property taxes may be the most unfair of taxes.

    In Philadelphia, property taxes were originally assessed on the amount of linear street frontage that a property had access to. That’s why early Philadelphians began building narrow but long rowhouses that took up less street frontage.

    By colonial times, the street-frontage method was modified in an attempt to capture some of the revenue that property owners generated from their properties. Back then, most property included a residence where the owner lived and a shop or workplace that the owner operated.

    Today, property doesn’t measure a family’s ability to pay taxes. Almost all residential property today is income-absorbing, not producing. Most families don’t make money from the property they live in until they sell their house.

    Since property taxes are linked to current market values, they rise and fall along with the market and this allows local governments to get hidden tax increases with rising assessments. Property taxes just aren’t fair. There is no relationship to the taxpayer’s ability to pay. They vary with the housing market and the ability and fairness of individual assessors. Property taxes also have unintended, and expensive consequences. They force owners to leave an area or subdivide and sell large lots to pay the taxes.

    Now with AVI, and online websites such as BRT, the City’s politicians can’t as easily hide tax increases or reward their supporters with low assessments and its beginning to hit the fan. We may be moving away from 40-year incumbents unless more-responsible fiscal management is implemented.

    You wanna charge me what? For what? C’mon! People are going to eventually start asking what the City is giving them for their money and if they can get more elsewhere. Adios!

    Sonny Duc
    February 21, 2013 at 1:28 pm

  2. Residential property taxes may be the most unfair of taxes.

    In Philadelphia, property taxes were originally assessed on the amount of linear street frontage that a property had access to. That’s why early Philadelphians began building narrow but long row houses that took up less street frontage.

    By colonial times, the street frontage method was modified in an attempt to capture some of the revenue that property owners generated from their properties. Back then, most property included a residence where the owner lived and a shop or workplace that the owner operated.

    Now, property doesn’t measure a family’s ability to pay taxes. Almost all residential property today is income-absorbing not producing. Most families don’t make money from the property they live in until they sell their house.

    Since property taxes are linked to current market values, they rise and fall along with the market and this allows local governments to get hidden tax increases with rising assessments. Property taxes just aren’t fair. There is no relationship to the taxpayer’s ability to pay. They vary with the housing market and the ability and fairness of individual assessors. Property taxes also have unintended, and expensive consequences. They force owners to leave an area or subdivide and sell large lots to pay the taxes.

    Now with AVI, and online websites such as BRT, the City’s politicians can’t as easily hide tax increases or reward their supporters with low assessments and its beginning to hit the fan. We may be moving away from 40 year incumbents unless more responsible fiscal management is implemented.

    You wanna charge me what? For what?? Cmon! People are going to eventually start asking what the City is giving them for their money and if they can get more elsewhere. Adios!

    Sonny Duca
    February 21, 2013 at 1:36 pm

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