POLS ON THE STREET: Margolies’ Resumé Runs Deep

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JAMES, 2nd-grader at Jubilee School in University City, joined his fellow students as he asks three questions about politics and government of State Rep. Jim Roebuck at USciences. Democratic Chair of House Education Committee, Roebuck is a former teacher.

JAMES, 2nd-grader at Jubilee School in University City, joined his fellow students as he asks three questions about politics and government of State Rep. Jim Roebuck at USciences. Democratic Chair of House Education Committee, Roebuck is a former teacher.

BY JOE SHAHEELI/ Marjorie Margolies looks good on paper. Since losing her seat due to voter indignation over delivering the one vote by which President Bill Clinton saddled a big income-tax hike on all taxpayers, she’s maintained a high profile.

Now she wants to regain the seat she lost back then as representative of the 13th Congressional Dist. in Pennsylvania. Can that profile translate into the votes she needs to overcome announced primary opponents State Rep. Brendan Boyle (D-Northeast) and State Sen. Daylin Leach (D-Montgomery)?

Both have strong followings in the 13th by virtue of their respective offices. In addition, Brendan has the support of the City’s Democratic organization for this go-around.

Margolies is the President of Women’s Campaign International, a group that provides advocacy training for women throughout the world. WCI was the first international organization to bring Bosnian and Serbian women together. Its trainings in Africa led to the doubling of women in several parliaments on the continent. WCI has gone to some of the most dangerous places in the world – from Afghanistan to Sri Lanka, Bosnia-Herzegovina to Columbia – to train, encourage, and empower women. And in each of these missions, she has brought a team that has included young women from the United States to carry on the mission of WCI for generations to come.

Margolies’ career has been a career of firsts: one of the first woman television journalists on the ground in Vietnam; the first unmarried US citizen to adopt a foreign child; the first woman ever elected to Congress from Pennsylvania in her own right; the first Democrat since 1916 elected from Pennsylvania’s 13th Dist.

During her term in the House, Margolies co-sponsored and fought for passage of legislation that is still relevant: the Family & Medical Leave Act, the ban on assault weapons, and increased federal funding for women’s health care.

In 1995, Margolies served as director of the United States delegation to the United Nations 4th World Conference on Women in Beijing, China, which created a global commitment to achieving equality, development and peace for women worldwide. Margolies is currently teaching at the Fels Institute of Government at the University of Pennsylvania. In addition, as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, Margolies lectures at universities throughout the country.

A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and a CBS News Foundation Fellow at Columbia University, Margolies began her career as a television journalist at WCAU-TV in Philadelphia. For two decades, Marjorie was a journalist with NBC and its owned and operated stations both in New York and Washington, DC. She was a contributing correspondent to the “Today Show”, “Sunday Today”, “A Closer Look” and CNBC.

MRS. MARIE Washington, 89 years old, was oldest senior in attendance at Senior Expo at Kipp Charter School hosted by State Rep. Ron Waters, who presented her with copy of his Older Americans Month Resolution.  Photo by Martin Regusters, Leaping Lion Photography

MRS. MARIE Washington, 89 years old, was oldest senior in attendance at Senior Expo at Kipp Charter School hosted by State Rep. Ron Waters, who presented her with copy of his Older Americans Month Resolution.
Photo by Martin Regusters, Leaping Lion Photography

In the meantime, looking to add to his voter base, Boyle keeps doing the right things in his district. He recently honored Lorin Williams for his 38 years of service to the school district in a variety of capacities. Upon presenting the citation, Boyle said, “His valiant career spans roles as a night patrol officer, an investigator, a supervisor for the Weapons Scan Division, and working with the Dist. 4 Regional Office. Mr. Williams’ dynamic career shines as an example of success and pride for him, his family and the School Police.”

Boyle has become a household name in much of the 13th, through his service as the 170th Legislative Dist. member, to which he was elected in 2008. He has also set up liaisons with other House members in the Montgomery Co. portion of the District. Boyle packs clout among fellow Democrats in the House because he heads their campaign committee.

Not missing vote-getting beats either, Daylin Leach has carried off the endorsement of the United Automobile, Aerospace & Agricultural Implement Workers of America.

“It is with great enthusiasm that the members of the UAW endorse Daylin Leach to replace Rep. Allyson Schwartz in Congress,” said Scott Adams, Director of UAW Region 9. “Since he was first elected to the Pennsylvania legislature in 2002, Daylin has demonstrated unmatched support for working families in Southeastern Pennsylvania. In countless instances, he has led the fight in Harrisburg to protect the middle class and preserve workers’ rights, while spurring economic development and creating more jobs. Our members know that he will bring the same fight to Washington that he’s known for in Harrisburg.”

OBAMA MUST HEED VOTER SENTIMENT

President Barack Obama may not find polls very interesting, since he can’t run for a third term. But he needs to heed public polling sentiment if he doesn’t want to go down in presidential history as one of this country’s lesser stars.

For the first time since his second term began, one of the major polls showed him joining the Congress on the minus side of the ledger in voter sentiment. He’s slipped down to the latter below 20%. This is based on Quinnipiac University’s national polling.

The President’s biggest drop is among independent voters, who give him a negative 37-57% score, compared to a negative 42-48% May 1. That’s due, says Peter Brown of the Quinnipiac Polling Institute, to “overwhelming bipartisan support for a special prosecutor to investigate the IRS. Voters apparently don’t like the idea of Attorney General Eric Holder investigating the matter himself, perhaps because they don’t exactly think highly of him. Holder gets a negative 23-39% job-approval rating.”

 

WELCOMING City Councilman Dennis O’Brien to SpArc were, from left, Denise Taylor Patterson, director of Phila. Individual Disability Services and Laura Princiotta, CEO of SpArc Phila. O’Brien visited Cultural Arts Center & Training Center to see PDDC clients working to fill contracts with companies. Photo by Bonnie Squires

WELCOMING City Councilman Dennis O’Brien to SpArc were, from left, Denise Taylor Patterson, director of Phila. Individual Disability Services and Laura Princiotta, CEO of SpArc Phila. O’Brien visited Cultural Arts Center & Training Center to see PDDC clients working to fill contracts with companies. Photo by Bonnie Squires

RETIRED REGISTRATION SECTION CHIEF DIES

Anybody who ever ran for office in this city for almost the past four decades knew they had a friend in Dennis Kelly, Elections Registration Bureau supervisor. He always had time, no matter how busy the demand on his office and staff, to patiently answer questions from candidates. He died recently at the age of 62. Dennis was a longtime member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians in America, Div. 87, and had the 4th degree conferred

PRO-CHARTER FOLKS MAY TAKE A BIG HIT

The House Education Committee on Monday moved to the floor a sweeping charter-school reform package supporters say will move an estimated $80 million a year from charters back to their districts. The committee separately passed legislation containing a three-year moratorium on new cyber charter schools.

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