Philadelphia Port Sees Double-Digit Growth

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CONTAINER ACTIVITY at Phila. Regional Port Authority’s Packer Avenue Marine Terminal is increasing, as well other break-bulk shipments at Tioga Terminal, showing almost 33% increase for the past year.

CONTAINER ACTIVITY at Phila. Regional Port Authority’s Packer Avenue Marine Terminal is increasing, as well other break-bulk shipments at Tioga Terminal, showing almost 33% increase for the past year.

Following on the heels of a very successful 2013 at the Port of Philadelphia, a year that marked the fourth consecutive year of double-digit growth here, initial cargo figures strongly indicate that 2014 should deliver more of the same.

Despite record snow in the northeast and particularly in Philadelphia this past winter, the facilities of the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority operated in business-as-usual fashion, and in fact saw several big increases in cargo.

“Last year the Port of Philadelphia handled 5,100,385 tons of cargo, a big 15% gain over 2012’s figures,” said Charles G. Kopp, Esq., chairman of the board of PRPA. “That also marked the fourth consecutive year of double-digit growth at the Port. And now, as we are well into 2014, it looks like this year will continue our trend of the current year building on the last. These great numbers from this past winter, in conjunction with terminals that are bustling with activity on a regular basis, indicate that this will be yet another terrific year at the Port of Philadelphia.”

Highlights include the following:

Containerized cargo continued its upward trend. 60,713 TEUs were handled in January and February 2014 compared to the 45,517 TEUs handled during the same period of 2013, a 33% gain. Counted as tonnage, this amounts to 384,115 tons of containerized cargo handled so far this year compared to the 318,117 tons moved that same period last year, a 21% gain.

Breakbulk cargoes (general cargo not shipped in containers) are so far up 17%, with 200,266 metric tons of cargo handled YTD 2014 compared to the 171,552 tons handled during the same period of 2013.

This is largely due to a major increase in steel traffic: 73,115 tons handled YTD 2014 compared to the 17,489 tons moved during the same period last year.

Automobiles are also seeing big gains so far this year: 35,875 metric tons of automobiles (primarily Hyundai and Kia automobiles from South Korea) were handled in January and February 2014 compared to the 23,206 tons handled during the same period of 2013, a 55% gain. Counted as individual units, 25,718 cars had been moved by the end of February, compared to the 17,143 cars moved in January and February 2013, a 50% gain.

With 232,963 metric tons of liquid bulk cargoes handled in January and February 2104 compared to the 215,434 tons handled during that same period of 2013, liquid bulk was up a solid 8%.

Looking at the Port of Philadelphia’s total cargo tonnage in January and February, 853,219 metric tons of cargo were handled at PRPA’s facilities year-to-date 2014 compared to the 728,309 tons handled during the same period of 2013, a 17% gain.

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2 Responses to Philadelphia Port Sees Double-Digit Growth

  1. Now if we could just connect all the pieces … sale of PGW by which the new owner could connect pipelines to Marcellus Shale … which could be key in developing Liquid Natural Gas (LNG), of which we already have LNG plants here that need to be tricked out to export … around the world…

    We figure all this out, we could be in business. The phrase “Go Big or Go Home!!” takes on a whole different meaning for the Port and the City as a whole. Who in Council will push to create the environment to make this real??

    We want jobs? We’re getting meds and eds right. We’re pushing tech. If we could just get the energy piece right … we’re a go for launch as a Global City.

    Are We Ready??
    April 3, 2014 at 12:43 pm

  2. What’s good for the port is a disaster for the rest of us.

    What’s missing in the above figures is how much tonnage left the port vs. what comes in. While more tonnage equates to more jobs at the port and other ports around the country, sadly, all of these numbers point towards more imports and the continued loss of American jobs. Whatever small gains are made at the port in terms of employment, you can bet that American workers in other sectors are paying dearly for those gains.

    I happy Korea gets to sell more cars in America; too bad Korea is buying less from America than ever before. Public Citizen reports that the overall trade deficit with Korea is up 47% in the first two years of the Korean trade deal alone. That translates into 46,000 American manufacturing jobs lost.

    We need to pay very close attention to numbers coming from America’s ports. Let’s put up the numbers of manufactured goods leaving the port up as well as the overall tonnage. Americans need to know what failed trade policy looks like. Port numbers help paint the picture and are a key bit of information.

    Rich Barber R.N.
    April 3, 2014 at 12:58 pm

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