Carpenters Union Helps Pink Sisters Mark Their 100th Anniversary

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PINK SISTERS, behind gated grill express their thanks to Ed Coryell, Jr., for help they received from Carpenters in announcing their 100th anniversary in June. Nuns are Sisters Mary Caritas, Mary Angelica, and Maria Clarissa. It is believed Pope Francis will make their convent one of his stops in Phila.

PINK SISTERS, behind gated grill express their thanks to Ed Coryell, Jr., for help they received from Carpenters in announcing their 100th anniversary in June. Nuns are Sisters Mary Caritas, Mary Angelica, and Maria Clarissa. It is believed Pope Francis will make their convent one of his stops in Phila.

 

They are best known as the Pink Sisters and that they live, work, and prayer behind a grated iron fence that keeps them from mingling with the public. Most Philadelphians are unaware of their existence.

But to Catholics and Christians of all faiths, many believe Philadelphians believe this city would have long gone the way of Detroit and other cities which have borne the brunt of economic and social failure if it were not for the prayers emanating around the clock from their home at 22nd & Green.

To those who know, “the Pink Sisters” is the pseudonym for Cloistered Contemplative Sisters, or the Holy Spirit Adoration Sisters, whose primary mission is to honor Jesus Christ in his presence in the Holy Eucharist during Masses and at all hours with their prayers. Joining them are hundreds of people who by the scores take part at any time of the day and night by visiting them in the chapel on Green Street.

UNION carpenter battles stiff wind to hang sign announcing 100th birthday celebration of Pink Sisters.

UNION carpenter battles stiff wind to hang sign announcing 100th birthday celebration of Pink Sisters.

Fully appreciative of what they contribute to the welfare of this city is Ed Coryell, Sr., executive secretary-treasurer/business manager of the Metropolitan Regional Council of Carpenters, whose headquarters is located just a short walk away from their chapel and convent. His carpenters this week lent a hand to the sisters by donating their services in hanging two huge banners announcing the 100th-anniversary celebration of what is now an international order consisting of 22 houses in 10 countries staffed by a total of over 450 nuns.

Founded by a German diocesan priest, Arnold Janssen, who saw the need for more prayer, his first volunteers came from active missionary sisters. It took root and in 1915, Mother Mary Michaele found its first convent in Philadelphia. Soon thereafter, Cornelius A. Lane bequeathed a generous sum for the establishment of an adoration convent for the sisters. Nine sisters were sent from Steyl, Germany, and American woman soon applied and were admitted.

The carpenters, led by Ed Coryell, Jr., made quick work of hanging the huge banners, despite heavy winds.

Coryell, Sr., whose union contributes many man hours to helping charities, said, “I strongly believe, if it weren’t for the prayers emanating from these sisters, 24-7, Philadelphia would not be the positive city it is right now.”

 

 

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